Edetate disodium–based treatment in a patient with diabetes and critical limb ischemia after unsuccessful peripheral arterial revascularizations: A case report

Title Edetate disodium–based treatment in a patient with diabetes and critical limb ischemia after unsuccessful peripheral arterial revascularizations: A case report
Journal Clinical Diabetes
Authors Ujueta F, Arenas IA, Yates T, et al.
Year Published 2019
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Reducing Cardiac Risks for Diabetics through Chelation Therapy

Chelation therapy was developed in the 1930s and was designed to remove heavy metals from the blood of severely metal-poisoned patients. In 2012, findings from the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) demonstrated benefits from chelation, particularly in diabetic patients with heart disease. The National Institutes of Health is supporting a second trial, TACT2, to verify the benefits of chelation therapy in diabetic patients who have had a prior heart attack.

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TACT Research Presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2018

The Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) demonstrated a major improvement in ischemic cardiac events in diabetic patients randomized to edetate disodium-based chelation. Research findings presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2018 suggest that TACT infusions in diabetic patients with critical limb ischemia are safe, increase excretion of vasculotoxic metals, may improve quality of life, and might improve clinical outcomes.

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Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease

Title Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease
Journal British Medical Journal
Authors Chowdhury R, Ramond A, O’Keeffe LM, et al.
Year Published 2018
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Conclusion
Exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, and copper is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease. Mercury is not associated with cardiovascular risk. These findings reinforce the importance of environmental toxic metals in cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioral risk factors.

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Crime of the Century: The Failure to Prevent the Lead Poisoning Pandemic (Video)

Clinician-scientist Bruce Lanphear, MD, has produced a video on the lead pandemic: “Over the last century the planet has experienced the largest mass contamination in history, a pandemic of lead poisoning. Brought on by the deception and negligence of a corporate collusion to extract immense profit from the sale of a known, harmful material, the subsequent waste has cast a toxic shadow over the earth, leaving in its wake death, disease and crime.”

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Lead could be fueling America’s high blood pressure epidemic

There’s one possible reason so many Americans, especially those living in inner cities, have high blood pressure: lead exposure.

Researchers tested people’s bones for evidence they took in lead over the years. The heavy metal accumulates in bone and stays there for decades as people drink lead-tainted water, breathe in dust carrying lead or get it some other way. But if something causes its release — anything from simple aging to pregnancy or thyroid disease — it can raise blood pressure.

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Cadmium level and severity of peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease

Title Cadmium level and severity of peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease
Journal European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Authors Ujueta F, Arenas IA, Diaz D, et al.
Year Published 2018
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Abstract
Coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) both share similar risk factor profiles, representing a high disease burden and cost worldwide. Yet the preferential development of CAD, PAD, or both in individual patients is not fully understood. As part of a study of toxic metals in patients with vascular disease, we explored toxic metal profiles in three principal diagnoses: CAD, PAD, and PAD with critical limb ischemia (CLI). CLI is the most advanced form of PAD and carries a high (up to 55%) one-year risk of major vascular events. The principal target of this investigation was cadmium, a toxic atherogenic transition metal of which the principal environmental sources are smoking and diet. The present study suggests that cadmium accumulation may be a quantitative risk factor for graded development of symptomatic disease of the lower extremities, from low cadmium burden in CAD only, intermediate cadmium burden in CAD+simple PAD, and highest cadmium burden in the most severe form of PAD – CLI.

Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

Title Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis
Journal The BMJ
Authors Chowdhury R, Ramond A, O’Keeffe L, et al.
Year Published 2018
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Abstract
This systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies investigating the association of arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, and copper with cardiovascular disease concludes that exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, and copper is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease. Mercury is not associated with cardiovascular risk. These findings reinforce the importance of environmental toxic metals in cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioral risk factors.