Cadmium level and severity of peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease

Title Cadmium level and severity of peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease
Journal European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Authors Ujueta F, Arenas IA, Diaz D, et al.
Year Published 2018
Link to article

Abstract
Coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) both share similar risk factor profiles, representing a high disease burden and cost worldwide. Yet the preferential development of CAD, PAD, or both in individual patients is not fully understood. As part of a study of toxic metals in patients with vascular disease, we explored toxic metal profiles in three principal diagnoses: CAD, PAD, and PAD with critical limb ischemia (CLI). CLI is the most advanced form of PAD and carries a high (up to 55%) one-year risk of major vascular events. The principal target of this investigation was cadmium, a toxic atherogenic transition metal of which the principal environmental sources are smoking and diet. The present study suggests that cadmium accumulation may be a quantitative risk factor for graded development of symptomatic disease of the lower extremities, from low cadmium burden in CAD only, intermediate cadmium burden in CAD+simple PAD, and highest cadmium burden in the most severe form of PAD – CLI.

Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

Title Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis
Journal The BMJ
Authors Chowdhury R, Ramond A, O’Keeffe L, et al.
Year Published 2018
Link to article

Abstract
This systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies investigating the association of arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, and copper with cardiovascular disease concludes that exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, and copper is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease. Mercury is not associated with cardiovascular risk. These findings reinforce the importance of environmental toxic metals in cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioral risk factors.

link to article

New study could help decide whether chelation benefits the heart

Chelation therapy has long been scorned by many in the medical community. But after a major study suggested it was somewhat effective for heart disease, the alternative health treatment is once again going under the microscope. A second study called TACT 2 (Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy) will assess chelation’s heart-health benefits for patients with diabetes.

Watch the video and read the full story.

Low-level lead exposure and mortality in US adults: a population-based cohort study

 

Title Low-level lead exposure and mortality in US adults:
a population-based cohort study
Journal The Lancet Public Health
Authors Lanphear BP, Rauch S, Auinger P, Allen RW, Hornung RW
Year Published 2018
Link to article

Abstract
Lead exposure is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality, but the number of deaths in the USA attributable to lead exposure is poorly defined. We aimed to quantify the relative contribution of environmental lead exposure to all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality, and ischaemic heart disease mortality. Our findings suggest that low-level environmental lead exposure is an important, but largely overlooked, risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality in the USA. A comprehensive strategy to prevent deaths from cardiovascular disease should include efforts to reduce lead exposure.

link to article

Free info session on diabetes, heart disease, and TACT2

TACT2 investigator Dr. Richard Nahas will present a free information session on diabetes, heart disease, and the TACT2 study on Tuesday, February 13, 7:00–8:30 p.m., at Ben Franklin Place in Ottawa, ON. RSVP required. Contact 613.727.7246 or trials@seekerscentre.com for more information.

Listen to Dr. Nahas talk about the history, goals, and significance of TACT2 in the video below.

Chelation Therapy as a Cardiovascular Therapeutic Strategy: the Rationale and the Data in Review

Title Chelation Therapy as a Cardiovascular Therapeutic Strategy: the Rationale and the Data in Review
Journal Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy
Authors Mathew RO, Schulman-Marcus J, Nichols EL, Newman JD, Bangalore S, Farkouh M, Sidhu MS
Year Published 2017
Link to article

Abstract
Chelation therapy, typically used to remove heavy metal toxins, has also been controversially used as a treatment for coronary artery disease. The first Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) aimed to provide evidence on chelation therapy’s potential for benefit or harm. Although TACT had some significant results, the trial does not provide enough evidence to recommend routine chelation therapy and has limitations. The second TACT was recently funded reigniting a discussion about the value of chelation therapy, its efficacy, and allocation of research resources. Despite limited evidence, patients continue to pursue chelation therapy as a treatment for coronary artery disease. As the medical community has a responsibility to understand all treatments patients pursue, it is important to comprehensively appraise chelation therapy for cardiovascular disease. Understanding the background of heavy metal toxicity, the putative target of chelation therapy, on the cardiovascular system is important to contextualize the role of chelation therapy in cardiovascular disease prevention. We review the clinical evidence of heavy metal toxicity and cardiovascular disease, and available clinical trial data on use of chelation therapy to minimize the cardiovascular burden of heavy metal toxicity.