New study could help decide whether chelation benefits the heart

Chelation therapy has long been scorned by many in the medical community. But after a major study suggested it was somewhat effective for heart disease, the alternative health treatment is once again going under the microscope. A second study called TACT 2 (Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy) will assess chelation’s heart-health benefits for patients with diabetes.

Watch the video and read the full story.

Low-level lead exposure and mortality in US adults: a population-based cohort study

 

Title Low-level lead exposure and mortality in US adults:
a population-based cohort study
Journal The Lancet Public Health
Authors Lanphear BP, Rauch S, Auinger P, Allen RW, Hornung RW
Year Published 2018
Link to article

Abstract
Lead exposure is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality, but the number of deaths in the USA attributable to lead exposure is poorly defined. We aimed to quantify the relative contribution of environmental lead exposure to all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality, and ischaemic heart disease mortality. Our findings suggest that low-level environmental lead exposure is an important, but largely overlooked, risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality in the USA. A comprehensive strategy to prevent deaths from cardiovascular disease should include efforts to reduce lead exposure.

Free info session on diabetes, heart disease, and TACT2

TACT2 investigator Dr. Richard Nahas will present a free information session on diabetes, heart disease, and the TACT2 study on Tuesday, February 13, 7:00–8:30 p.m., at Ben Franklin Place in Ottawa, ON. RSVP required. Contact 613.727.7246 or trials@seekerscentre.com for more information.

Listen to Dr. Nahas talk about the history, goals, and significance of TACT2 in the video below.

Chelation Therapy as a Cardiovascular Therapeutic Strategy: the Rationale and the Data in Review

Title Chelation Therapy as a Cardiovascular Therapeutic Strategy: the Rationale and the Data in Review
Journal Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy
Authors Mathew RO, Schulman-Marcus J, Nichols EL, Newman JD, Bangalore S, Farkouh M, Sidhu MS
Year Published 2017
Link to article

Abstract
Chelation therapy, typically used to remove heavy metal toxins, has also been controversially used as a treatment for coronary artery disease. The first Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) aimed to provide evidence on chelation therapy’s potential for benefit or harm. Although TACT had some significant results, the trial does not provide enough evidence to recommend routine chelation therapy and has limitations. The second TACT was recently funded reigniting a discussion about the value of chelation therapy, its efficacy, and allocation of research resources. Despite limited evidence, patients continue to pursue chelation therapy as a treatment for coronary artery disease. As the medical community has a responsibility to understand all treatments patients pursue, it is important to comprehensively appraise chelation therapy for cardiovascular disease. Understanding the background of heavy metal toxicity, the putative target of chelation therapy, on the cardiovascular system is important to contextualize the role of chelation therapy in cardiovascular disease prevention. We review the clinical evidence of heavy metal toxicity and cardiovascular disease, and available clinical trial data on use of chelation therapy to minimize the cardiovascular burden of heavy metal toxicity.

Effect of high-dose oral multivitamins and minerals in participants not treated with statins in the randomized Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT)

Title Effect of high-dose oral multivitamins and minerals in participants not treated with statins in the randomized Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT)
Journal American Heart Journal
Authors Omar M. Issa, DO, Rhonda Roberts, MPH, Daniel B. Mark, MD, MPH, Robin Boineau, MD, Christine Goertz, DC, PhD, Yves Rosenberg, MD, MPH, Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, Erminia Guarneri, MD, Jeanne Drisko, MD, Allan Magaziner, DO, Kerry L. Lee, PhD, Gervasio A. Lamas, MD
Year Published 2018
Link to article

Abstract
In a prespecified subgroup analysis of participants not on statin therapy at baseline in the TACT, a high-dose complex oral multivitamins and multimineral regimen was found to have a large unexpected benefit compared with placebo. The regimen tested was substantially different from any vitamin regimen tested in prior clinical trials. High-dose oral multivitamin and multimineral supplementation seem to decrease combined cardiac events in a stable, post-MI population not taking statin therapy at baseline. These unexpected findings are being retested in the ongoing TACT2.