Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease

Title Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease
Journal British Medical Journal
Authors Chowdhury R, Ramond A, O’Keeffe LM, et al.
Year Published 2018
Link to article

Conclusion
Exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, and copper is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease. Mercury is not associated with cardiovascular risk. These findings reinforce the importance of environmental toxic metals in cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioral risk factors.

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Crime of the Century: The Failure to Prevent the Lead Poisoning Pandemic (Video)

Clinician-scientist Bruce Lanphear, MD, has produced a video on the lead pandemic: “Over the last century the planet has experienced the largest mass contamination in history, a pandemic of lead poisoning. Brought on by the deception and negligence of a corporate collusion to extract immense profit from the sale of a known, harmful material, the subsequent waste has cast a toxic shadow over the earth, leaving in its wake death, disease and crime.”

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Lead could be fueling America’s high blood pressure epidemic

There’s one possible reason so many Americans, especially those living in inner cities, have high blood pressure: lead exposure.

Researchers tested people’s bones for evidence they took in lead over the years. The heavy metal accumulates in bone and stays there for decades as people drink lead-tainted water, breathe in dust carrying lead or get it some other way. But if something causes its release — anything from simple aging to pregnancy or thyroid disease — it can raise blood pressure.

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Cadmium level and severity of peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease

Title Cadmium level and severity of peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease
Journal European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Authors Ujueta F, Arenas IA, Diaz D, et al.
Year Published 2018
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Abstract
Coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) both share similar risk factor profiles, representing a high disease burden and cost worldwide. Yet the preferential development of CAD, PAD, or both in individual patients is not fully understood. As part of a study of toxic metals in patients with vascular disease, we explored toxic metal profiles in three principal diagnoses: CAD, PAD, and PAD with critical limb ischemia (CLI). CLI is the most advanced form of PAD and carries a high (up to 55%) one-year risk of major vascular events. The principal target of this investigation was cadmium, a toxic atherogenic transition metal of which the principal environmental sources are smoking and diet. The present study suggests that cadmium accumulation may be a quantitative risk factor for graded development of symptomatic disease of the lower extremities, from low cadmium burden in CAD only, intermediate cadmium burden in CAD+simple PAD, and highest cadmium burden in the most severe form of PAD – CLI.

Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

Title Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis
Journal The BMJ
Authors Chowdhury R, Ramond A, O’Keeffe L, et al.
Year Published 2018
Link to article

Abstract
This systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies investigating the association of arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, and copper with cardiovascular disease concludes that exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, and copper is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease. Mercury is not associated with cardiovascular risk. These findings reinforce the importance of environmental toxic metals in cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioral risk factors.

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New study could help decide whether chelation benefits the heart

Chelation therapy has long been scorned by many in the medical community. But after a major study suggested it was somewhat effective for heart disease, the alternative health treatment is once again going under the microscope. A second study called TACT 2 (Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy) will assess chelation’s heart-health benefits for patients with diabetes.

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Low-level lead exposure and mortality in US adults: a population-based cohort study

 

Title Low-level lead exposure and mortality in US adults:
a population-based cohort study
Journal The Lancet Public Health
Authors Lanphear BP, Rauch S, Auinger P, Allen RW, Hornung RW
Year Published 2018
Link to article

Abstract
Lead exposure is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality, but the number of deaths in the USA attributable to lead exposure is poorly defined. We aimed to quantify the relative contribution of environmental lead exposure to all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality, and ischaemic heart disease mortality. Our findings suggest that low-level environmental lead exposure is an important, but largely overlooked, risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality in the USA. A comprehensive strategy to prevent deaths from cardiovascular disease should include efforts to reduce lead exposure.